​​​


 
Reading Out Loud
Content Is King… It is the work that makes the difference
Major things to remember:
Own the space            This is your work… demonstrate you care
Manage your breath            Punctuation should guide you… Read ahead
Make the words dance        Breathe life into your words
Emphasize the important parts    Demonstrate with your voice

Feelings        Help the reader feel the caress of the wind… taste the vinegar 
Emotions        Fear of snakes… The sensation of falling… Sound of a gun being cocked
Reactions        The cold hand on your shoulder in the dark… A kiss on the neck
Dialogue        Different voices for different characters…
            Inflections… Speed of delivery… Emphasize the important

Your selection     Choose a self-contained scene … 
            Have a Beginning, Middle, and End
            Should have a small cast of characters… Four or less.
            Pick easily identified characters
Volume
    Projection… Read to the people in the back of the room
    Speak slower… About half of your normal speech speed
            Let the listener follow you
            No droning… Writing was developed to record spoken speech
    Your words should tell the story… Use tone and inflection for the important parts.
Practice practice practice practice practice practice practice






 






Stephen Kings Ten Rules for Success

One Love what you do.

Two Be yourself.

Three Explore new ideas.

Four The good ideas stay with you.

Five Love the process.

Six Learn from rejections.

Seven Look for ideas you enjoy.

Eight Find your creative process.

Nine Pass something on.

Ten Tell great stories.

Earl Nightingale's Ten Rules for Success

One Improve your attitude.

Two Recognize opportunity.

Three Exercise your mind.

Four Invest in yourself.

Five Increase your service.

Six Become irreplaceable.

Seven Don't follow the follower.

Eight Treat your customers well.

Nine Learn how to solve problems.

Ten We become what we think about.

Are those you are following, going where you want to go?

Earl Nightingale 

BRUNCH AT THE BLACKBIRD CAFE


Our next Brunch will be Tuesday, DECEMBER 27 at 10:15 a.m. at the Reynolds Library (College Street at the Bypass). Knox Room B is the third door on your right as you enter the Library lobby.If we are not there, we will in the meeting room be at the far end of the library directly across from the circulation desk.

 

You are allowed to bring your own food or you can purchase drinks, pastries, salads, sandwiches and quiche at the Blackbird Cafe across the lobby. Join us for conversation on any and all topics.

  

Join us for lively conversation about anything and everything. You can also bring a short (1500 words or less) manuscript to share or for a critique.

 

EMERY RED CANOE AWARD

 

At the June Twin Lakes Writers meeting, Chuck Butkus brought a box of cards with topics designed to inspire writers with starting points. Four of our members each selected a card. These were: 

a recent immigrant

prison

abandoned building

fear of getting old

For the Red Canoe, you are to use all four in a 500 word or less story. 
Twin Lakes Writers

SATURDAY JUNE 11 WILL BE THE MEETING 
TWIN LAKES WRITERS NEWSLETTER

http://www.twinlakeswriters.org/

 

Meeting: Saturday, June 11

1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Hall

401 E. 9th Street (Highway 5 and College)

Mountain Home

Gray blue building that used to be a store. The sign on 9th Street reads “Fellowship Hall.” The College Street sign reads “Unitarian Universalist Church.” Park either in front or back. Enter through glass door on 9th Street (Highway 5)

 

SEND ME INTERESTING INFORMATION YOU COME ACROSS  

AND WHAT YOU ARE WRITING, SUBMITTING AND PUBLISHING

 

MAY MEETING

Heather Tolliver joined us at the May meeting. She writes historical fiction. She is in the “Professional Writing” Masters Degree program at Arkansas State University, Mountain Home. Steve Kampen made a presentation on “Tips for a Successful Book Signing” (see attachment to newsletter).

 

EMERY RED CANOE AWARD  

 Chuck Butkus won the Emery Red Canoe at the May meeting with his entry “How to Write a Story” (see end of newsletter). He will bring information about the next Red Canoe Award topic to our June meeting.

 

BRUNCH AT THE BLACKBIRD CAFE 

Our next Brunch will be Tuesday, AUGUST 23 from 10:15 a.m. until noon in Knox Room B. Knox Room B is the third door on your right as you enter the Library lobby. If you don’t find us in Knox B, we will be in the smaller conference room on the outside wall to your left in the main library. Join us for conversation on any and all topics.

         

MEMBER NEWS

 

From Bill Rhodes:  On Writing by Stephen King. The book is delightful! A bit of an autobiography inextricably linked to learning to write. I love it. I don't suppose it is written for the strait-laced Christian writers. But life is like a potato right out of the ground.

 

From Charlie Lineberry:

“I have finished the story about my sister’s incident in the late 60’s, which some of you might remember from the meetings last year. Self published on CreateSpace. It is available on amazon.com. Book title BROTHER’S JUSTICE by Lineus Berry. I think there are some members of your group that will enjoy the story.  

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=Brother%27s+Justice+Lineus+Berry

 

From Kerri Fivecoat-Campbell: (she attended a few meetings several years ago)

“I will be having a book signing for my new book at Hasting’s in Mountain Home from 10 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.-1 on Saturday, June 18.

My latest book: Living Large in Our Little House: Thriving in 480 Square Feet With Six Dogs, a Husband And One Remote…Plus More Stories of How You Can, Too, Reader’s Digest Books/Simon & Schuster June 2016

 

WRITERS CONFERENCES

 

Ozark Writers League         http://www.ozarkswritersleague.com/

August 19-20, 2016                     details to come later

Honeysuckle Inn

Branson, MO

 

WRITING MARKETS AND CONTESTS

 

The OWL “Art and Photo” Contest         http://www.ozarkswritersleague.com/

has been moved to their August meeting. Jan Morrill is the Director of this contest and will be sending out additional information soon.

           

The Masters Review                http://mastersreview.com/short-story-award-for-new-writers/

$5000 Awarded to Emerging Writers

Deadline July 15

 

The Masters Review Volume V is now open for submissions. Ten writers will be published nationally and become part of an exclusive mailing to editors, agents, and publishers.  

 

OF INTEREST TO WRITERS

 

Attached as a PDF is Steve Kampen’s presentation of Tips for a Successful Book Signing.”

 

Steve LeBlanc says http://www.scribophile.com/ is the best online critique group. If you join, you must do five critiques for each critique you get for your own work.

 

Emery Red Canoe Award Winner

 

How to write a story

By C Allan Butkus

 

          Have you ever wanted to write a story? Although it may seem a magical process, it's more of a logical, creative process. As your story develops it must have; a Beginning, a Middle, and End.

          There are many different ways to write a story, the process does not start with paper and pencil or a computer screen. It always starts with an idea. A good idea, one so strong and intriguing you must give it life.

          Early ideas are similar to clouds. Completed stories are similar to clocks.

          Thoughts and ideas have many of the qualities of a cloud in the summer sky. They can be seen, but they are constantly changing, shifting, drifting. They are tangible only for a short time and then they drift away into nothingness. The idea for your story must be grasped carefully before it drifts away. At birth, an idea is fragile; you are the only one to give it life.

          Your story when completed will cease to be a cloud. It will be transformed into a clock. The reader will be able to tell the exact time, to the second. You are the one who will create that magic moment, that moment when an idea gives birth to a story.

          First steps:

                    Nurture your idea into an interesting topic or plot. This is your cloud.

                    Identify your readers and their need.

                    Write a story that you would like to read. Let the winds blow.

          The cloud of your idea will change as you write. Your first draft is you telling yourself the story. Your story will be an unfolding mystery. You will not know the whole story because you haven't written it yet. Don't worry about it.

          In the beginning, your cloud will hover above the ground; this creates the scene where you plant the idea.

          For the scene to develop it must have a character or two. This is where the story begins.     Your characters should shift and change as the story progresses, as the clouds do. The winds of your story determine the size and direction of the clouds, and the shadows they cast. Let the story tell itself. As you write, do not edit.

          You bring to your page unique abilities and experiences. No one has traveled your path before; consequently, your story is truly your story. As intuitive as you can be, it is impossible for you to know your story, until you write it. Let the story flow. Give the winds of your imagination free reign.

          As your story changes from a cloud to a clock, you will find it takes practice, as well as patience, and more than a healthy helping of determination. Nevertheless, when you hold your completed story in your hand you will find all the work was worthwhile. For this is your story, your clock. Moreover, it came to you from the clouds.

                   

Submitted by Chuck Butkus:

How to Write a How To Article

 

Choose your topic carefully.

Choose a clear, succinct title.

Clearly state what is being taught.

Convey the content of the article in as few words as possible.

Pinpoint your audience.

Write an introduction that summarizes your article.

One well-worn trick is to include a question in the opening line to capture a reader's interest. For example: "Have you ever wondered how to write an engaging introduction?"

Add a list of supplies, if needed.

Write your instructions in the form of steps.

Cite any sources you've consulted.

Add additional tips or advice.

Copyedit (proofread) for errors.

 

TWIN LAKES WRITERS WEBSITE

Send Cherie Neal things to post on our website; your photos, short writing or poems, information about books you have for sale. If you want your bio or your contact information on the Twin Lakes Writers website, send Cherie cherieneal@hotmail.com a short bio (under 100 words) including any links to your own website, Facebook page, or where your books can be purchased.  

 

NEWSLETTER INFORMATION

Please send me information about what you're writing, also any information you think our members would find useful or interesting including MARKETS, CONTESTS, CONFERENCES, WEBSITES, bits of whimsy, helpful information, etc.

 

Susan Varno, Newsletter Editor

PO Box 71, Dolph, AR 72528   870-297-4223            mailto:svarno@hughes.net

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TUESDAY,AUGUST 23 at 10:15 a.m. to noon
THIRD TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH AT THE REYNOLDS LIBRARY
IN TWO WEEKS  WE WILL HAVE A BRUNCH

BRUNCH AT THE BLACKBIRD CAFE

 

Our next Brunch will be Tuesday, JUNE 21, at 10:15 a.m. at the Reynolds Library (College Street at the Bypass). Knox Room B is the third door on your right as you enter the Library lobby.If we are not there, we will in the meeting room be at the far end of the library directly across from the circulation desk.

 

You are allowed to bring your own food or you can purchase drinks, pastries, salads, sandwiches and quiche at the Blackbird Cafe across the lobby. Join us for conversation on any and all topics.

  

Join us for lively conversation about anything and everything. You can also bring a short (1500 words or less) manuscript to share or for a critique.

 

EMERY RED CANOE AWARD

 

Chuck Butkus won the Emery Red Canoe at the February meeting. He will bring information about the next Red Canoe Award topic to our June meeting.

 

From Kerri Fivecoat-Campbell (she attended a few meetings several years ago)

 

I will be having a book signing for my new book (see below) at Hasting’s in Mountain Home from 10-1 on Sat. June 18.

My latest book: Living Large in Our Little House: Thriving in 480 Square Feet With Six Dogs, a Husband And One Remote…Plus More Stories of How You Can, Too, Reader’s Digest Books/Simon & Schuster June 2016
TUESDAY, April 26 at 10:15 a.m. to noon








 
PAST ANNOUNCEMENTS
BRUNCH AT THE BLACKBIRD CAFE

 

Our next Brunch will be Tuesday,MAY 24, at 10:15 a.m. at the Reynolds Library (College Street at the Bypass). Knox Room B is the third door on your right as you enter the Library lobby. If we are not there, we will be in the meeting room at the far end of the library directly across from the circulation desk.

 

You are allowed to bring your own food or you can purchase drinks, pastries, salads, sandwiches and quiche at the Blackbird Cafe across the lobby. Join us for conversation on any and all topics. Join us for lively conversation about anything and everything. You can also bring a short (1500 words or less) manuscript to share or for a critique.

 

EMERY RED CANOE AWARD

 

Susan Varno won the Red Canoe at the February meeting. Her suggested topic is

 

Write a “How To” Article

 

Write step by step instructions on “how to do something.” This can be a skill, hobby, craft, personal experience, safety, cooking, gardening, writing, anything that requires instructions. Hopefully, you will choose to explain something the rest of us will find useful and may even try. If you can’t explain it all in 500 words, explain some part. 




 










Writers

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