Writers

TWIN LAKES WRITERS
http://www.twinlakeswriters.org
Meeting: Saturday, November 14
1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Hall
401 E. 9th Street (Highway 5 and College)
Mountain Home
Gray blue building that used to be a store. The sign on 9th Street reads “Fellowship Hall.” The College Street sign reads “Unitarian Universalist Church.” Park either in front or back. Enter through glass door on 9th Street (Highway 5)
SUSAN VARNO WILL PRESENT WORKSHOP AT OWLS, NOVEMBER 21
Susan Varno will be one of the featured speakers at the November OWLS conference
She will give a workshop on “Writing Non-Fiction and Regional Publication Do’s and Don’ts.”
(Personal note from Susan: I hope some of you will attend the OWLS Conference on Saturday, November 21 in Branson. OWLS is going through a difficult time. If you believe the organization should continue, please show your support by attending. Also, I’m nervous about speaking. Come and support me too. Thanks.)
FROM OZARKS WRITERS LEAGUE
Thursday, October 1, 2015
Dear OWL Members,
After yesterday’s resignation from OWL President Casey Cowan, the office of President was passed down according to the succession in the OWL bylaws. Jessica Nelson, OWL Secretary, and Fred Pfister, OWL Historian, have respectfully declined the offer to act as Interim-President. As the Membership Director and next in line, I humbly accepted the position and the duties until the November election. Many of you have contacted me expressing encouragement and support for the future of OWL. For that, I thank you.

Diane Yates, Interim-President Ozarks Writers League
From: “Ozarks Writers” <ozarkswritersleague@gmail.com>
Date: Tuesday, October 6, 2015 6:39 PM
If you would be interesting in serving in any capacity or would like to be nominated as an officer for the 2016 year, please contact me at Diane@DianeYates.com. I would very much like to pass your information on to our nominating committee and/or next year’s slate of officers. In order to be the kind of resourceful writers group needed in the Ozarks, it requires us all working together. Your reply can be as simple as “I’m willing to offer supportive help at events, or I’m willing to serve on a committee, or I would like to serve on the new board of directors.” I look forward to hearing from you.

Diane Yates, Interim-President, Ozarks Writers League
TWIN LAKES WRITERS OCTOBER MEETING

Ray Bachman attended after a long absence. His health is better. Poet and songwriter William Wynn attended for the first time. President Chuck Butkus asked if some of us would be willing to read longer manuscripts, several chapters, longer short stories. Those who have longer works and those willing to read would send the manuscript by e-mail and either receive comments via e-mail, phone or at the next meeting.
EMERY RED CANOE AWARD
John Brinkman won the Emery Red Canoe Award in August. His topic for next time is “My Most Memorable Journey.” The contest will be held at our November meeting. For the contest, you may write up to 500 words on the subject.
REYNOLDS LIBRARY
Local Author Book Sale and Signing Event
Saturday, December 5, 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm
Authors: Registration for display space starts November 1 at www.baxlib.org
Used Book Sale
Thursday, November 19 and Friday,November 20, 8:30 am to 5:00 pm
Saturday, November 21, 8:30 am to 1:00 pm (1/2 price until noon Saturday, after that $2 a bag.

BRUNCH AT THE BLACKBIRD CAFE

Our next Brunch will be Tuesday, November 24, from 10:15 a.m. until noon in Knox Room B. Knox Room B is the third door on your right as you enter the Library lobby. You are allowed to bring your own food or you can purchase drinks, pastries, salads, sandwiches and quiche at the Blackbird Cafe across the lobby. Join us for conversation on any and all topics.

Dates for 2015: December 22
ROBERT HARPER
Bob Harper was one of the founders of the Writers Support Group that merged with Twin Lakes Writers. He was a past president of both organizations. He was always encouraging of fellow writers, invited us to his house, arranged a Twin Lakes picnic at the Bull Shoals Lake pavilion. His wife Anna didn’t write, but often drove him to meetings. She was a valuable member of our group.
Bob died October 13.
Robert Harper, 77 (From the Baxter Bulletin, October 14)
Funeral Services for Robert Edward Harper, 77, of Bull Shoals, Arkansas, will be 11 AM, Friday October 16, 2015, at Kirby & Family Funeral Home in Bull Shoals, AR with Brother Terry Frizzell officiating. Visitation will be Friday, October 16, 2015, from 10 AM until time of service.

Robert passed away October 13, 2015, in Flippin, Arkansas. He was born January 24, 1938, to a sharecropper family in Stonewall, Oklahoma, the son of Robert and Jewel Dillion Harper. At age seven, his family migrated to Newhall, California for his sister’s health. He captured the love of his life, Anna Tyler and married her on August 28, 1959 in Newhall. Robert worked as an Engineer for General Motors in Van Nuys, CA. When he walked away from the company, he was the leader of 50 supervisors controlling four separate departments.

Robert was a veteran of the U.S. Army. Robert moved with Anna to Bull Shoals in 1983. Since then, Robert has be deeply involved in Bull Shoals as past owner of Rivercliff Trout Dock, past president of White River Outfitters, designed and built a number of houses, served four years as a Bull Shoals Councilman in the 90’s, was the Charter Secretary for the Lions Club, was the President of the Twin Lakes Writers Group for five years, charter member and later president of the Bull Shoals Historical Society, Secretary for the Friends of Library and served on the Planning & Zoning committee beginning in 2011. Most days you would find Robert at the Bull Shoals Historical Museum sharing his extensive knowledge of Bull Shoals. He also found the time to write three books,History of Bull Shoals, Bull Shoals Dam and Amazing Facts.

Robert is survived by his wife, Anna Harper of Bull Shoals, AR,; daughter, Mallory Anne (Scott) Francisco of Joplin, MO; son, Robert Matthew (Dawn) Harper of Bull Shoals, AR; brother, Thomas Ray (Emily) Harper of Stillwater, OK; sisters, Glenda Arnhart and Nancy Jo Craigson of Stillwater, OK; seven grandsons; one great-granddaughter and one great grandson. He was preceded in death by his parents. Burial will be in the Kirby’s Tucker Memorial Cemetery with Mathew Harper, Randy Lott, Clabe Presley, Ralph Lanning, and Rick Klug as pallbearers. Memorials may be made to the Bull Shoals Historical Society (PO Box 150, Bull Shoals, AR 72619). Arrangements by Kirby and Family Funeral and Cremation Services.

WRITING CONFERENCES
OWLS Conference       http://www.ozarkswritersleague.com/
Friday, November 20th Awards Banquet
Saturday, November 21st “Making the Write Connections”
9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Honeysuckle Inn & Conference Center
3598 Shepherd of the Hills Expressway
Branson, MO
Directions: From Highway 65, take the Hwy. 248 exit to Shepherd of the Hills Expressway. Continue east to the Honeysuckle Inn & Conference Center on the right, at the corner of Shepherd of the Hills Expressway and Hwy. 76.
Speakers:
Kathleen Rodgers: “Writing Fiction and Pursuing Your Dreams”
Susan Varno: Writing Non-Fiction, Regional Publications”
From Diane Yates: This is YOUR opportunity to reconnect with writing friends and industry
professionals, get an editor or agent to take your book pitch, and receive insider tips on fiction and nonfiction publishing. Our NEW venue offers a special overnight rate for guests, and keeps us all under one roof with the Friday night awards banquet and Saturday lunch BOTH catered on site! Make your reservations and meal selections by clicking the website above.

WRITING MARKETS/CONTESTS
AARP Bulletin         http://www.aarp.org/bulletin/
has a monthly feature called “What I Really Know.” Each month subscribers are invited to write a 400-word essay on a topic. The topic is different every month. If you are a member of AARP, look at this feature.
Also, every month they have a feature for subscribers, “Random Acts of Kindness.”
Saving and Endangered Species Playwriting Prize
Write a play – Save an endangered species    Visit  http://www.sesprize.com/ for complete guidelines
NO ENTRY FEE
Deadline: November 30, 2015.
Saving Endangered Species (SES) International Playwriting Prize aims to get people talking about, and doing something about, saving our endangered species.
SES Prize is seeking 10-minute plays where writers will chose one or more species as listed with CITES, World Wildlife Fund, or any other organization that list endangered species. Eight to ten plays will be chosen for a Staged Reading at a California theatre with an award of $100 for each play. The audiences’ “ticket” will be a donation to a specified non-profit Wildlife Conservancy.

Plays may be comedic, dramatic or for young audiences (performed by adult actors). No adaptations or musicals. Maximum four actors. One submission per playwright. Previously produced plays are accepted, published plays are not.
TWIN LAKES WRITERS WEBSITE
Send Cherie things to post on our website; your photos, short writing or poems, information about books you have for sale. If you want your bio or your contact information on the Twin Lakes Writers website, send Cherie Neal twinlakeswriters@outlook.com  a short bio (under 100 words) including any links to your own website, Facebook page, or where your books can be purchased.
NEWSLETTER INFORMATION
Please send me information about what you’re writing, also any information you think our members would find useful or interesting including MARKETS, CONTESTS, CONFERENCES, WEBSITES, bits of whimsy, helpful information, etc.
Susan Varno, Newsletter Editor
PO Box 71, Dolph, AR 72528
870-297-4223            mailto:svarno@hughes.net

TWIN LAKES WRITERS

http://www.twinlakeswriters.org

Meeting: Saturday, October 10

1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Hall

401 E. 9th Street (Highway 5 and College)

Mountain Home

Gray blue building that used to be a store. The sign on 9th Street reads “Fellowship Hall.” The College Street sign reads “Unitarian Universalist Church.” Park either in front or back. Enter through glass door on 9th Street (Highway 5)

This Month: Blackbird in a different room                                                 See Member News

EMERY RED CANOE AWARD

John Brinkman won the Emery Red Canoe Award in August. His topic for next time is “My Most Memorable Journey.” The contest will be held at our November meeting. For the contest, you may write up to 500 words on the subject.

REYNOLDS LIBRARY

Local Author Book Sale and Signing Event

Saturday, December 5, 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm

Authors: Registration for display space starts November 1 at www.baxlib.org

Used Book Sale

Thursday, November 19 and Friday, November 20, 8:30 am to 5:00 pm

Saturday, November 21, 8:30 am to 1:00 pm (1/2 price until noon Saturday, after that $2 a bag.

BRUNCH AT THE BLACKBIRD CAFE
Our next Brunch will be Tuesday, October 27, from 10:15 a.m. until noon.

ATTENTION:
This month only we will NOT MEET IN KNOX ROOM B. We will meet in Small Conference Room B. This room is straight back in the aisle past the public computers through the non-fiction and fiction book stacks on the outside wall.

You are allowed to bring your own food or you can purchase drinks, pastries, salads, sandwiches and quiche at the Blackbird Cafe across the lobby. Join us for conversation on any and all topics.
Dates for 2015: November 24, December 22

BARBARA LAWRY (1934 – 2015)

B. J. Lawry attended Twin Lakes Writers several years ago. We hadn’t seen her for a while, but this year she attended a couple of meetings. She had a great deal of writing experience and wrote wonderful memoirs of her childhood.

From the Baxter Bulletin: Barbara (BJ) Lawry, 80

Barbara (BJ) Lawry, 80, of Mountain Home passed away Sunday August 30, 2015 at her home. Barbara was born September 18, 1934 in Camden, New Jersey. Her family moved to Miami, Florida when she was twelve. She is survived by three children, Susan Guest of Mountain Home, David (Kathy) Guest of Orlando, Florida, Donald Guest of North Carolina, five grandchildren, Jennifer Rice, Stephanie Smith, Courtney Guest, Traci Guest, David Guest, Jr., and twelve great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her parents John and Mary (Jencski) Davies, her son Steve Guest and brother Jack Davies. She was a writer who had worked for the Baxter Bulletin, as well as newspapers in Princeton, Fort Lauderdale and Las Vegas. She also wrote a history of Cotter, Arkansas, “The Story of A Small Town” and published numerous short stories. She enjoyed volunteering at Baxter Regional Medical Center, and in the past at the local Humane Society and the Senior Center. Memorials can be made to the Mountain Home Humane Society.

MEMBER NEWS

From Ray Bachman: Hope to see you one of these days. I am feeling a lot stronger and should be driving again shortly. Cherie, Neal and I (as of now) are going to be displaying our books at the Interiors Marketplace Mall for October through December. The mall is at 201 N. College, just a block off US 62, catta-corner across from Walgreen. It was a home interior place, rather upscale. When Hobby Lobby came in, they couldn’t compete with prices so they converted it into an artisan mall. I did not know about it until Cherie contacted me. It is really quite nice. A lot of good variety and they do some classes, etc., as well. They have a pretty good Facebook page.

We will be setting up our bookshelf in the next couple of days. Marian Yancey has her pottery there and seems to be doing quite well. When we had the books at the Calico Rock Museum it seems that someone made us a wooden sign. Do you know who has that and if it would be available to use at the place we are going to be?

Ray’s book on Bible prophecy, Christians, Jews and the End Times released July 15, 2014

http://www.createspace.com/3450322

Mythlore: A Journal of J.R.R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, Charles Williams, and Mythopoeic Literature Magazine (Rutgers University) has accepted Nancy Bunting’s  article “1904 Tolkien, Trauma and Its Anniversaries” for publication in their October edition.
Nancy e-mailed, “The editor wants exactly one (ONE!) sentence changed and one footnote (which I agree needs a tweak).She is going out on a limb to reproduce the key picture in black-and -white and it really adds to the article. I told her I was thrilled. I am still kinda stunned.”

National Poetry Month Publications – April 2015, Patricia A. Oplinger’s winning poetry was published in two anthologies:

Fresh Breath (Poetry Society of Tennessee – Northeast, Memphis, TN)

“The Couple on the Six o’clock News” free verse

“The Fallen” a villanelle to honor those who fought D-Day, June ’44

“Hugs and Hormones” rhyming verse based on scientific fact

Poems of the Super Moon (Pen Women Press, Washington, D.C.).

“Home” free verse honors Christ’s Nativity

September 5, 2015 White County Creative Writers, Harding University, Searcy, AR, Patricia A. Oplinger received the following honors.

Poetry: First Honorable Mention – “New Dreams: – Free Verse

Prose: Third Place “Kara” – Character sketch

First Honorable Mention for “Helpful Hint” Advice column

WRITING CONFERENCES

Ozark Creative Writers, Inc. details, registration at http://ozarkcreativewriters.com

48th Annual Conference

October 8, 9, 10, 2015 (Thursday, Friday, Saturday)

Early Bird registration $120, after that $140 or $160, dinners extra

Rent a table to sell your books $25

Inn of the Ozarks

Eureka Springs, AR

OWLS Conference       http://www.ozarkswritersleague.com/#!november/c1h1j

November 20th and 21st  No details yet. Check their website later

Show Me Masterclass

https://mizzouebm.wordpress.com/2015/05/29/save-the-date-show-me-writers-masterclass/

Columbia Writer’s Guild and Mizzou Publishing

Missouri State University Student Center

Columbia, MO

Saturday, November 7

Early Bird Price $60

Submit a portion of your work for advanced review ($15) or meet with a mentor ($20) one on one during the event.

WRITING MARKETS/CONTESTS

AARP Bulletin         http://www.aarp.org/bulletin/

has a monthly feature called “What I Really Know.” Each month subscribers are invited to write a 400-word essay on a topic. The topic is different every month. If you are a member of AARP, look at this feature.

Also, every month they have a feature for subscribers, “Random Acts of Kindness.”

Saving and Endangered Species Playwriting Prize

Write a play – Save an endangered species    Visit  http://www.sesprize.com/ for complete guidelines

NO ENTRY FEE

Deadline: November 30, 2015.

Saving Endangered Species (SES) International Playwriting Prize aims to get people talking about, and doing something about, saving our endangered species.

SES Prize is seeking 10-minute plays where writers will chose one or more species as listed with CITES, World Wildlife Fund, or any other organization that list endangered species. Eight to ten plays will be chosen for a Staged Reading at a California theatre with an award of $100 for each play. The audiences’ “ticket” will be a donation to a specified non-profit Wildlife Conservancy.

Plays may be comedic, dramatic or for young audiences (performed by adult actors). No adaptations or musicals. Maximum four actors. One submission per playwright. Previously produced plays are accepted, published plays are not.

TWIN LAKES WRITERS WEBSITE

Send Cherie things to post on our website; your photos, short writing or poems, information about books you have for sale. If you want your bio or your contact information on the Twin Lakes Writers website, send Cherie Neal twinlakeswriters@outlook.com a short bio (under 100 words) including any links to your own website, Facebook page, or where your books can be purchased.

NEWSLETTER INFORMATION

Please send me information about what you’re writing, also any information you think our members would find useful or interesting including MARKETS, CONTESTS, CONFERENCES, WEBSITES, bits of whimsy, helpful information, etc.

Susan Varno, Newsletter Editor

PO Box 71, Dolph, AR 72528

870-297-4223            mailto:svarno@hughes.net

© 2015 Microsoft
Terms
Privacy & cookies
Developers
English (United States)

TWIN LAKES WRITERS

http://www.twinlakeswriters.org

Meeting: Saturday, September 12

1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Hall

401 E. 9th Street (Highway 5 and College)

Mountain Home

Gray blue building that used to be a store. The sign on 9th Street reads “Fellowship Hall.” The College Street sign reads “Unitarian Universalist Church.” Park either in front or back. Enter through glass door on 9th Street (Highway 5)

AUGUST MEETING

We had several new people at our meeting. Stuart Benedict writes young adult fantasy. Sue Adams Smyth is writing personal memoirs. She works with the Literary Council as a tutor. Juli Moore is writing fiction. Monterey Sirak published her autobiography “Barefoot on Broken Glass.” She also has published three books of her poetry.

EMERY RED CANOE AWARD

John Brinkman won the Emery Red Canoe Award. His topic for next time is “My Most Memorable Journey.”

REYNOLDS LIBRARY

Local Author Book Sale and Signing Event

Saturday, December 5, 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm

Authors: Registration for display space starts November 1 at www.baxlib.org

Used Book Sale

Thursday, November 19 and Friday, November 20, 8:30 am to 5:00 pm

Saturday, November 21, 8:30 am to 1:00 pm (1/2 price until noon Saturday, after that $2 a bag.

BRUNCH AT THE BLACKBIRD CAFE

Our next Brunch will be Tuesday, September 22, from 10:15 a.m. until noon. Knox Room B is the third door on your right as you enter the Library lobby. You are allowed to bring your own food or you can purchase drinks, pastries, salads, sandwiches and quiche at the Blackbird Cafe across the lobby. Join us for conversation on any and all topics.

Dates for 2015: October 27, November 24, December 22

MEMBER NEWS

Nancy Bunting was invited to read her paper about J. R. R. Tolkien, “Fairies, Fairy Queens, and the Character of Guinevere in The Fall of Arthur” at the Mythcon Convention in Colorado Springs July 31. She reports as follows:

“I delivered the paper in good style to a small, but clearly interested audience (maybe 20 people; there were maybe 120 at the conference). I want you to know that I read this paper out loud every day for one week and found errors or areas to improve each time. Polished prose is SUCH a time suck! Anyway, Jason Fisher was there and he had previously edited a very good collection of Tolkien papers, and he said it was ‘a good paper.’ Mythlore magazine should take this paper as they sponsor the conference and I did get to meet my editor, Janet Croft, briefly. She said that she would be putting together the fall/winter Mytholore in September, and she wanted a few changes.”

From Chuck Butkus:

This is for those of my older generation who do not really comprehend why Facebook exists. Presently, I am trying to make friends outside of Facebook while applying the same principles. Therefore, every day I go down on the street and tell the passers-by what I have eaten, how I feel, what I have done the night before and what I will do tomorrow night. Then I give them pictures of my family, my dog and me gardening and spending time in my pool. I also listen to their conversations and I tell them I love them. And it works. I already have three persons following me: two police officers and a psychiatrist.

From Bill Rhodes: I brought my daughter, Jodi, down from NYC to help me sell books.

She just interacted with everyone, including some musicians and everyone had a great time. By the time Saturday evening was over, I had sold at least a dozen books. I sold mostly “Come Hell or High Water” but a few copies of “Hillbilly in China” and one of “Moving Experiences.” Very successful marketing experience – new for me!

BOOKS BY BILL RHODES – Print & Kindle

“Fragments in the Wind”

“Moving Experiences”

“Hillbilly in China”

“Come Hell or High Water”

Susan Varno’s article “Gloria Sanders: Preserving Calico Rock” appears in the August/September issue of MARVELOUS magazine. You can pick up free copies of the magazine at various locations in Mountain Home.

WRITING CONFERENCES

Ozark Creative Writers, Inc. details, registration at http://ozarkcreativewriters.com

48th Annual Conference

October 8, 9, 10, 2015 (Thursday, Friday, Saturday)

Early Bird registration $120, after that $140 or $160, dinners extra

Rent a table to sell your books $25

Inn of the Ozarks

Eureka Springs, AR

Show Me Masterclass

https://mizzouebm.wordpress.com/2015/05/29/save-the-date-show-me-writers-masterclass/

Columbia Writer’s Guild and Mizzou Publishing

Missouri State University Student Center

Columbia, MO

Saturday, November 7

Early Bird Price $60

Submit a portion of your work for advanced review ($15) or meet with a mentor ($20) one on one during the event.

WRITING MARKETS/CONTESTS

Ozark Writers League Contest                    http://www.ozarkswritersleague.com/

Deadline September 21

Contest Chair Velda Brotherton

Entry fee $15

On website, open “Events” green tab at top, click on “2015 Contest” for list of contests and how to enter.

Join us for another exciting year of award-winning writing. OWL members may enter any or all of the categories listed below for just $10. (You must be an OWL member to enter contest.)

​Entries must be postmarked no later than September 21st.

General Category Contests

1st $125 – 2nd $100 – 3rd $75​​​​​​​​​​​

#1 Gene Andereck Short Story Contest

Short story. Limit 3,000 words.

1st $50 – 2nd $30 – 3rd $20

#2 Hardboiled Noir Fiction

Noir/Pulp-Fiction short story (3,000 words max) or 40 pages or two chapters and synopsis of your hardboiled-style novel.

#3 Romantic Short Story

Romantic short story (3,000 words max) or 40 pages or two chapters and synopsis of your romance novel of any era.

#4 Western Short Story

Western short story (3,000 words max) or 40 pages or two chapters and synopsis of your western novel.

#5 Paranormal/Sci-Fi Short Story

Paranormal or Science Fiction short story (3,000 words max) or 40 pages or two chapters and synopsis of your paranormal or sci-fi novel.

#6 Flash Fiction, 99-Words

Using only 99 words, write a flash fiction story with a beginning, middle and end.

#7 Poetry

Any form, 26-line limit. Must list the poetry form/style on your cover sheet.

#8 Unpublished Manuscript

First 3 chapters and synopsis of your as-yet unpublished novel. Limit 50 pages.

#9 Best Book of the Year ($100 first place only)

Your book must have been published during 2013 Any genre, hard cover or paper backs. No electronic books.

#10 President’s Award

This award recognizes the best of the best. Overall winner in all categories receives a trophy and $200.

25th Annual Jeffrey E. Smith Editor’s Prize

Fiction, Nonfiction & Poetry

Deadline: October 1, 2015                            $5000 prize in each category

Sponsored by The Missouri Review       http://www.missourireview.com/tmrsubmissions/editors-prize-contest/

University of Missouri, Columbia

Entry fee: $20

AARP Bulletin         http://www.aarp.org/bulletin/

has a monthly feature called “What I Really Know.” Each month subscribers are invited to write a 400-word essay on a topic. The topic is different every month. If you are a member of AARP, look at this feature.

Also, every month they have a feature for subscribers, “Random Acts of Kindness.”

Saving and Endangered Species Playwriting Prize

Write a play – Save an endangered species    Visit  http://www.sesprize.com/ for complete guidelines

NO ENTRY FEE

Deadline: November 30, 2015.

Saving Endangered Species (SES) International Playwriting Prize aims to get people talking about, and doing something about, saving our endangered species.

SES Prize is seeking 10-minute plays where writers will chose one or more species as listed with CITES, World Wildlife Fund, or any other organization that list endangered species. Eight to ten plays will be chosen for a Staged Reading at a California theatre with an award of $100 for each play. The audiences’ “ticket” will be a donation to a specified non-profit Wildlife Conservancy.

Plays may be comedic, dramatic or for young audiences (performed by adult actors). No adaptations or musicals. Maximum four actors. One submission per playwright. Previously produced plays are accepted, published plays are not.

TWIN LAKES WRITERS WEBSITE

Send Cherie things to post on our website; your photos, short writing or poems, information about books you have for sale. If you want your bio or your contact information on the Twin Lakes Writers website, send Cherie Neal twinlakeswriters@outlook.com a short bio (under 100 words) including any links to your own website, Facebook page, or where your books can be purchased.

NEWSLETTER INFORMATION

Please send me information about what you’re writing, also any information you think our members would find useful or interesting including MARKETS, CONTESTS, CONFERENCES, WEBSITES, bits of whimsy, helpful information, etc.

Susan Varno, Newsletter Editor

PO Box 71, Dolph, AR 72528

870-297-4223            mailto:svarno@hughes.net

© 2015 Microsoft
Terms
Privacy & cookies
Developers
English (United States)

TWIN LAKES WRITERS

http://www.twinlakeswriters.org

Meeting: Saturday, August 8

1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Hall

401 E. 9th Street (Highway 5 and College)

Mountain Home

Gray blue building that used to be a store. The sign on 9th Street reads “Fellowship Hall.” The College Street sign reads “Unitarian Universalist Church.” Park either in front or back. Enter through glass door on 9th Street (Highway 5)

JULY MEETING and BLACKBIRD

At our meeting at Blackbird, Steve Kampen brought a rough draft for a poster advertising Twin Lakes Writers. Susan Varno made it into a poster and will have copies at our August meeting. If you know a place you can put up the poster; a library, a bulletin board, a school, senior center, etc., pick up a copy or two at the meeting. Earlier, we discussed making bookmarks with Twin Lakes Writers information. Chuck Butkus is printing these and will have them at the August meeting. Take a few to give to anyone you meet who is interested in attending our meetings.

EMERY RED CANOE AWARD THIS MONTH (Really)

Mance Wright won the May Emery Red Canoe Award for his story “Are We There Yet?” The topic he proposes for the next Emery Red Canoe is “Your First Car.” The next Award will be THIS MONTH (really)

BRUNCH AT THE BLACKBIRD CAFE

Our next Brunch will be Tuesday, August 25, from 10:15 a.m. until noon. Knox Room B is the third door on your right as you enter the Library lobby. You are allowed to bring your own food or you can purchase drinks, pastries, salads, sandwiches and quiche at the Blackbird Cafe across the lobby. Join us for conversation on any and all topics.

Dates for 2015: September 22, October 27, November 24, December 22

TWIN LAKES WRITERS WEBSITE

Send Cherie things to post on our website; your photos, short writing or poems, information about books you have for sale. If you want your bio or your contact information on the Twin Lakes Writers website, send Cherie Neal twinlakeswriters@outlook.com  a short bio (under 100 words) including any links to your own website, Facebook page, or where your books can be purchased.

MEMBER NEWS

The following two people are interested in joining Twin Lakes Writers but haven’t attended a meeting yet.

Bob Boatright (Bill Rhodes met him and is encouraging his work.) “I live on Mary Bob Lane off of Denton Ferry Road. I literally live on the back forty in a forest valley. I am pursuing Nature Photography, almost 400 years of Family American History, and Conservative Economic Politics.

Juli Moore (She called Susan Varno. She found about TLW from the Library website.) Just wanted to thank you for taking the time to talk to me about the Twin Lakes Writers’ Group. I am looking forward to meeting fellow writers and participating in the group. Best regards, Juli Moore

WRITING CONFERENCES

New Ozark Writers League Conference              http://www.ozarkswritersleague.com/

(As of August 3, there is no information on their website about the August conference)

Friday, August 21 and Saturday, August 22

Ozarks Technical College

Accommodations at the Hotel Grand Victorian

Friday night session 7:30 pm at Grand Victorian (no dinner)

Saturday

8:30 am North Lobby of OTC

Theme: The Big Picture: a study of stage and screen writing

Speaker Mark Landon Smith

Ozark Creative Writers, Inc. details, registration at http://ozarkcreativewriters.com

48th Annual Conference

October 8, 9, 10, 2015 (Thursday, Friday, Saturday)

Early Bird registration $120, after that $140 or $160, dinners extra

Rent a table to sell your books $25

Inn of the Ozarks

Eureka Springs, AR

Conference Contest: Due by September 1

New Show Me Masterclass

https://mizzouebm.wordpress.com/2015/05/29/save-the-date-show-me-writers-masterclass/

Columbia Writer’s Guild and Mizzou Publishing

Missouri State University Student Center

Columbia, MO

Saturday, November 7

Early Bird Price $60

Submit a portion of your work for advanced review ($15) or meet with a mentor ($20) one on one during the event.

WRITING MARKETS/CONTESTS

New Ozark Writers League Contest            http://www.ozarkswritersleague.com/

Deadline September 21

Contest Chair Velda Brotherton

Entry fee $15

On website, open “Events” green tab at top, click on “2015 Contest” for list of contests and how to enter.

25th Annual Jeffrey E. Smith Editor’s Prize

Fiction, Nonfiction & Poetry

Deadline: October 1, 2015                            $5000 prize in each category

Sponsored by The Missouri Review       http://www.missourireview.com/tmrsubmissions/editors-prize-contest/

University of Missouri, Columbia

Entry fee: $20

AARP Bulletin         http://www.aarp.org/bulletin/

has a monthly feature called “What I Really Know.” Each month subscribers are invited to write a 400-word essay on a topic. The topic is different every month. If you are a member of AARP, look at this feature.

Also, every month they have a feature for subscribers, “Random Acts of Kindness.”

Saving and Endangered Species Playwriting Prize

Write a play – Save an endangered species    Visit  http://www.sesprize.com/ for complete guidelines

NO ENTRY FEE

Deadline: November 30, 2015.

Saving Endangered Species (SES) International Playwriting Prize aims to get people talking about, and doing something about, saving our endangered species.

SES Prize is seeking 10-minute plays where writers will chose one or more species as listed with CITES, World Wildlife Fund, or any other organization that list endangered species. Eight to ten plays will be chosen for a Staged Reading at a California theatre with an award of $100 for each play. The audiences’ “ticket” will be a donation to a specified non-profit Wildlife Conservancy.

Plays may be comedic, dramatic or for young audiences (performed by adult actors). No adaptations or musicals. Maximum four actors. One submission per playwright. Previously produced plays are accepted, published plays are not.

OF INTEREST TO WRITERS

From Chuck Butkus:

Susan  I think this might help some of us with editing.

The program we discussed at the last meeting can be found at

http://www.writewords.org.uk

There are also other programs available such as phrase counter. These are free and do not entail getting newsletters or other spam.

The program is easy to use:

After reaching the website click on:     Word frequency counter

Paste you story into the block (about a thousand words works well)  and  click

A list appears ranking the words by frequency.

NEWSLETTER INFORMATION

Please send me information about what you’re writing, also any information you think our members would find useful or interesting including MARKETS, CONTESTS, CONFERENCES, WEBSITES, bits of whimsy, helpful information, etc.

Susan Varno, Newsletter Editor

PO Box 71, Dolph, AR 72528

870-297-4223            mailto:svarno@hughes.net

Dear Twin Lakes Writers

The Newsletter said

The EMERY RED CANOE AWARD was to be this month. I was mistaken. The contest entries are due in August.

Mance Wright won the May Emery Red Canoe Award for his story “Are We There Yet?” The topic he proposes for the next Emery Red Canoe is “Your First Car.” The Award will in August.

Susan Varno

Newsletter Editor

last month

TWIN LAKES WRITERS

http://www.twinlakeswriters.org

Meeting: Saturday, July 11

1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Hall

401 E. 9th Street (Highway 5 and College)

Mountain Home

Gray blue building that used to be a store. The sign on 9th Street reads “Fellowship Hall.” The College Street sign reads “Unitarian Universalist Church.” Park either in front or back. Enter through glass door on 9th Street (Highway 5)

THIS IS OUR LONGEST NEWSLETTER EVER!

SCROLL DOWN TO:                                                               Blackbird Room Change this month only

Emery Red Canoe Award This Month                How to Use Twitter to promote your book

Three new writing contests

TWIN LAKES WRITERS MEMBER CYNTHIA ESTY’S OBITUARY

(From Baxter Bulletin Obituaries) Cynthia Esty passed away May 21st, 2015 in Marina Del Rey, California, while living with her daughter. She was 80 years young and much loved. Her life was well traveled from Wisconsin to Florida, California, Illinois and finally to Mountain Home, Arkansas, where the house and cabin on Promise Land Road became Cynthia and Wayne’s retirement sanctuary. Wayne passed away in 2009. After she retired as a teacher and educator, Cynthia and Wayne built their dream home, planted flowers, working endlessly and loving every minute of it. Cynthia had such a creative talent, which she shared by making handmade cards, sending monthly newsletters, and even writing her first novel. She was a courageous, strong and independent soul, loved to work in-and-outdoors, decorated the house for each season, entertained with neighbors and friends, and walked two miles daily to feed the local horses. Cynthia’s spirit is carried on by her sister Hazel, her six children – Kathy, Liz, Jean, Michael, Susan, and RJ, eleven grandchildren and two great-grandchildren as well as an extended family of friends from all walks of life. Cynthia’s family will remember her ready smile, warmth, energy, quick wit, and the incredible joy she felt for life, family and friends. She made a difference in the lives of many. We cherish and love her dearly.

JUNE MEETING

We discussed allowing people to bring a manuscript longer than 1500 words for critique. We agreed if someone had a longer manuscript, that person should read last so everyone gets a chance to read.

Chuck Butkus passed around a copy of In D’Tale Magazine aimed at independent publishers http://www.indtale.com/

Christine Edwards reported she is attending the 4-H Teen Novel Contest meetings and acting as a mentor. These are held every Saturday at the Library. They have 13 young people involved. If you want to help, you don’t have to attend every meeting. If you are interested, contact Jared Lillis http://www.teennovelist.com/

Steve LeBlanc recommended the website “National Novel Writing in a Month” which offers a contest to write a book in a month. This is an exercise in discipline and creativity.http://nanowrimo.org/

Larry Brooks’ book “Story Engineering” on how to organize your novel was recommended. http://www.thecreativepenn.com/2011/03/27/story-engineering-larry-brooks/

EMERY RED CANOE AWARD THIS MONTH

Mance Wright won the May Emery Red Canoe Award for his story “Are We There Yet?” The topic he proposes for the next Emery Red Canoe is “Your First Car.” The next Award will be THIS MONTH.

BRUNCH AT THE BLACKBIRD CAFE

Our next Brunch will be Tuesday, July 28, from 10:15 a.m. until noon.

ATTENTION:

This month only we will NOT MEET IN KNOX ROOM B. We will meet in Small Conference Room B. This room is straight back in the aisle past the public computers through the non-fiction and fiction book stacks on the outside wall. The library is moving us this month only because they need Knox B for “a one-time government training event.”

For Brunch at Blackbird, you may bring your own food or can purchase drinks, pastries, salads, sandwiches and quiche at the Blackbird Cafe across the lobby. Join us for conversation on any and all topics.

Dates for 2015: August 25, September 22, October 27, November 24, December 22

TWIN LAKES WRITERS WEBSITE

Send Cherie things to post on our website; your photos, short writing or poems, information about books you have for sale. If you want your bio or your contact information on the Twin Lakes Writers website, send Cherie Neal cherieneal@hotmail.com a short bio (under 100 words) including any links to your own website, Facebook page, or where your books can be purchased.

MEMBER NEWS

From: Ray Bachman: After having a case of Shingles in December, I spent the entire winter in a very weakened state. I became fatigued very quickly. After Jeanne and I arrived home from Florida, I was able to carry out my pastoral activities at Wesley UMC with difficulty.

By May 18, my doctor put me in the hospital where it was determined that I needed open heart surgery to correct some severe blockage. The surgery was Thursday, May 28. They performed a triple by-pass which went very well and from which I am recovering well, but somewhat slowly because of my weakened condition prior to the surgery. I am a prime candidate for Congestive Heart Failure. This means special diet concerns, which Jeanne is studying to implement.

The other side of the story is that when they opened my chest to do the surgery, they discovered that I have a cancer called Multiple Myeloma. I am claiming my complete healing from this cancer and ask that you continue to pray with us that the healing, which is ours through the wounds of Jesus, will be totally evident in my body very soon.

I spent a total of 26 days in the hospital, 12 of those in the acute rehab unit. I am presently in home health care with regular visits from a nurse and a physical therapist. Though all these difficult days, Jeanne has been a constant help and encourager. Days like this are difficult not only for the patient but for their spouses as well.

Praise the name of Jesus! The Adversary thought he was going to take me out, but we serve a powerful God who has His hand on His children and will keep them in health and power as long as He has a work for them to do. I am excited about the prospects of what the Lord has in store for the days ahead. Please continue to make your requests known unto God with thanksgiving that the healing I already possess in Jesus will soon be totally evident.

(If you want to contact Ray with words of encouragement)

Ray and Jeanne Bachman

1813 Fairway Drive, Mountain Home, AR 72653

870-425-2733 or 870-405-4033              bachmanjr@gmail.com

Ray’s new book on Bible prophecy, “Christians, Jews and the End Times”

http://www.createspace.com/3450322 released July 15, 2014.

From Lineus Berry: His book “Marceline” is available from http://www.amazon.com/Marceline-Lineus-Berry/dp/1629943622/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1436183969&sr=1-1&keywords=marceline+lineus+berry or go to Amazon and search Books “Marceline Lineus Berry”

From Bill Rhodes: I suppose my experience is similar to that of our recent president of Twin Lakes Writers. Althea Daniels edited all my old books and put them on Kindle with color pictures. I’m much happier that she has upgraded my fumbling attempts when I was ill. So, three of my books are available on Kindle and the fourth – my first novel, “Come Hell or High Water” will be on Kindle toward the last of July.

I met a very interesting fellow who lives in Cotter. He is endowed with writing the memoirs of his family and has done a great deal of photography of natural things. I invited him to our poetry and writer’s groups. He may need some help, but not too much. He’s written a great deal already. His publication: U.S. Army Corporal Bill Beaumont’s 1918 WWI Diary.

WRITING CONFERENCES

Ozark Creative Writers, Inc. details, registration at http://ozarkcreativewriters.com

48th Annual Conference

October 8, 9, 10, 2015 (Thursday, Friday, Saturday)

Early Bird registration $120, after that $140 or $160, dinners extra

Rent a table to sell your books $25

Inn of the Ozarks

Eureka Springs, AR

Conference Contest: Due by September 1

WRITING MARKETS/CONTESTS

NEW Ozarks Romance Authors

A non-profit, multi-genre group for writers in Southwest Missouri Ozarks Romance Authors

ORACON Writing Conference

2015 Weta Nichols Writing Contest

Entries accepted April 1 – July 15, 2015

FINAL ROUND JUDGES:

Louise Fury of “The Bent Agency” will judge Historical and Young Adult/Middle Grade

Candace Havens with Entangled Publishing will judge Contemporary and Paranormal/Sci-Fi

Submit the first chapter (up to 2,500 words) of your unpublished novel to win prizes and a chance to be read by one of the agents or editors serving as our final judges. Contest is open to both published and unpublished authors, but the piece submitted must be unpublished and not under contract to be published.

Entries are open genre and not required to contain romantic tones. Categories in which entries may be judged are:

Historical     Contemporary       Paranormal/Sci-Fi        Young Adult/Middle Grade.

Membership in Ozarks Romance Authors is not required in order to enter. There will be three prizes awarded in each category:

1st place – $75 and a 1-Year ORA Membership (a $25 value)

2nd place – $50

3rd place – $25.

Entry fee $25.00

Read requirements at

http://ozarks-romance-authors.com/annual-contest/2015-weta-nichols-writing-contest/

Finalists will be announced around September 1, 2015. Only the top three finalists in each category will be read by our final judges. Winners will be announced at our 2015 Annual Conference on September 19, 2015 in Springfield, Missouri.

NEW The Masters Review Short Story Award for New Writers

https://mastersreview.com/short-story-award-for-new-writers/

$2000 and publication also prizes of $200 and $100

Reviewed by Curtis Brown Agency

Deadline July 15, 2015

Entry Fee $20

NEW 25th Annual Jeffrey E. Smith Editor’s Prize

Fiction, Nonfiction & Poetry

Deadline: October 1, 2015                            $5000 prize in each category

Sponsored by  The Missouri Review       http://www.missourireview.com/tmrsubmissions/editors-prize-contest/

University of Missouri, Columbia

Entry fee: $20

AARP Bulletin         http://www.aarp.org/bulletin/

has a monthly feature called “What I Really Know.” Each month subscribers are invited to write a 400-word essay on a topic. The topic is different every month. If you are a member of AARP, look at this feature.

Also, every month they have a feature for subscribers, “Random Acts of Kindness.”

Saving and Endangered Species Playwriting Prize

Write a play – Save an endangered species    Visit  http://www.sesprize.com/ for complete guidelines

NO ENTRY FEE

Deadline: November 30, 2015.

Saving Endangered Species (SES) International Playwriting Prize aims to get people talking about, and doing something about, saving our endangered species.

SES Prize is seeking 10-minute plays where writers will chose one or more species as listed with CITES, World Wildlife Fund, or any other organization that list endangered species. Eight to ten plays will be chosen for a Staged Reading at a California theatre with an award of $100 for each play. The audiences’ “ticket” will be a donation to a specified non-profit Wildlife Conservancy.

Plays may be comedic, dramatic or for young audiences (performed by adult actors). No adaptations or musicals. Maximum four actors. One submission per playwright. Previously produced plays are accepted, published plays are not.

OF INTEREST TO WRITERS

From: Steve LeBlanc

If this were a quiz on proper word spelling, I would have garnered maybe 50%. This is some fine level distinctions.

Advice on Copy Reading

https://medium.com/@penguinrandomus/a-to-x-writing-advice-courtesy-of-copy-chief-benjamin-dreyer-c00bd746b99e

Books In Common               http://www.booksincommon.org/

(Terra Com) was founded in 2001. Community Reading Programs as envisioned by pioneering

Seattle Librarian Nancy Pearl were in their infancy. Since then, Books in Common has connected with thousands of literary programs across the globe, helping event planners as

they face the sometimes daunting task of selecting the perfect book for their communities,

partnering with the author, and ensuring that their specific goals are met and exceeded—-year

after year. We focus on these important programs because we passionately believe

that building common ground around literature is one of the best ways to bridge

the divide among race, religion, socio-economics, sexual orientation, politics,

and cultural identities.

From Chuck Butkus:

The 10 Awful Truths About Book Publishing

Written by Steven Piersanti, President of Berrett-Koehler Publishers

The number of books being published in the U.S. has exploded. Bowker reports that over one million (1,052,803) books were published in the U.S. in 2009, which is more than triple the number of books published four years earlier (2005) in the U.S. (April 14, 2010 Bowker Report). More than two thirds of these books are self-published books, reprints of public domain works, and other print-on-demand books, which is where most of the growth in recent years has taken place. In addition, hundreds of thousands of English-language books are published each year in other countries.

Book industry sales are declining, despite the explosion of books published. Book sales in the U.S. peaked in 2007 and then fell by nearly five percent between 2007 and 2009, according to the Association of American Publishers (April 7, 2010 AAP Report). Similarly, bookstore sales peaked in 2007 and have fallen since, according to the U.S. Census Bureau (Publishers Weekly, February 22, 2010). The major bookstore chains have been especially hard hit, with a 12 percent sales decline between 2007 and 2009 (Publishers Weekly, April 12, 2010).

Average book sales are shockingly small, and falling fast.

Combine the explosion of books published with the declining total sales and you get shrinking sales of each new title. According to Nielsen BookScan – which tracks most bookstore, online, and other retail sales of books (including Amazon.com) – only 282 million books were sold in 2009 in the U.S. in all adult nonfiction categories combined (Publishers Weekly, January 11, 2010). The average U.S. nonfiction book is now selling less than 250 copies per year and less than 3,000 copies over its lifetime.

A book has less than a 1% chance of being stocked in an average bookstore.

For every available bookstore shelf space, there are 100 to 1,000 or more titles competing for that shelf space. For example, the number of business titles stocked ranges from less than 100 (smaller bookstores) to approximately 1,500 (superstores). Yet there are 250,000-plus business books in print that are fighting for that limited shelf space.

It is getting harder and harder every year to sell books. Many book categories have become entirely saturated, with many books on every topic. It is increasingly difficult to make any book stand out. New titles are not just competing with a million recently published books, they are also competing with more than seven million other books available for sale. And other media are claiming more and more of people’s time. Result: investing the same amount of effort today to market a book as was invested a few years ago will yield a fraction of the sales previously experienced.

Most books today are selling only to the authors and publishers communities. Everyone in the potential audiences for a book already knows of hundreds of interesting and useful books to read but has little time to read any. Therefore, people are reading only books that their communities make important or even mandatory to read. There is no general audience for most nonfiction books, and chasing after such a mirage is usually far less effective than connecting with one’s communities.

Most book marketing today is done by authors, not by publishers. Publishers have managed to stay afloat in this worsening marketplace only by shifting more and more marketing responsibility to authors, to cut costs and prop up sales. In recognition of this reality, most book proposals from agents and experienced authors now have an extensive (usually many pages) section on the author’s marketing platform and what the author will do to market the book. Publishers still fulfill important roles in helping craft books to succeed and making books available in sales channels, but whether the books move in those channels depends primarily on the authors.

No other industry has so many new product introductions. Every new book is a new product, needing to be acquired, developed, reworked, designed, produced, named, manufactured, packaged, priced, introduced, marketed, warehoused, and sold. Yet the average new book generates only $100,000 to $200,000 in sales, which needs to cover all of these expenses, leaving only small amounts available for each area of expense. This more than anything limits how much publishers can invest in any one new book and in its marketing campaign.

The digital revolution is expanding the number of products and sales channels but not increasing book sales. We are in the early stages of an explosion in digital versions of books and digital sales channels for books and portions of books. However, early indications are that the digital revenues are replacing traditional book revenues rather than adding to overall book revenues. The total book publishing pie is not growing, but it is now being divided among even more products and markets, thus further crowding and saturating the marketplace. And although some digital costs are lower, other costs are higher while price points are lower – making digital profits even slimmer than print profits thus far.

The book publishing world is in a never-ending state of turmoil. The thin margins in the industry, high complexities of the business, intense competition in a small industry, rapid growth of new technologies, and expanding competition from other media lead to constant turmoil in book publishing. Translation: expect even more changes and challenges in coming months and years.

STRATEGIES FOR RESPONDING TO “THE 10 AWFUL TRUTHS”

The game is now pass-along sales.

Events/immersion experiences replace traditional publicity in moving the needle.

Leverage the authors’ and publishers’ communities.

In a crowded market, brands stand out.

Master new sales and marketing channels.

Build books around a big new idea.

Front-load the main ideas in books and keep books short.

From Chuck Butkus

Arkansas Writers Conference  June 2015

Presentation by Cara Brookins

Social media is becoming the primary tool for new authors. This is because it provides          free tools.

She currently has 200,000 followers on twitter.

Contact information:        mysocialfam.com

info@ mysocialfam.com   Free twitter tutorials are available on this website.

If you wish to sell books, it is necessary to build a friend network. Social media provides a means of doing this. Your choice of what media to use is determined by what you like to do.

Twitter… Maximum length of your Tweet is 140 characters.

Facebook      Instagram     LinkedIn    et cetera

If people become interested in your posts, they will want to find out more about you. This will lead to sales.

In your posts, do not consistently push your books. Be subtle… About one in three posts for your work can be mentioned. Constantly posting buy, buy, buy… Turns the reader off. The reason for your postings is to interest them in you as a person. Bring the reader into your “family”.

The networks are out there, need to learn how to get into them.

The best thing to do… is get involved.      The worst thing to do… Is nothing

It was estimated (2009) in the history of the world, 130 million books have been published.

In the year 2009     one million new books were published

(This was triple the number of books published in 2005)

In the year 2013                 348, 000 were self-published

In 2009 there were 2 million people on twitter.  In 2014 there were 5 million tweets a day!

If they can’t find you, they won’t buy from you.  Engage the reader with shared stuff about your life.

Don’t spread yourself too thin. If you try to use too many platforms in social media, you will fail. Concentrate on one platform… Your choice…

Tweet Sweet… Only Tweet positive stuff. The goal is for people to retweet… Your tweets

Do Not use abbreviations such as LOL… You’re wasting valuable space.

Remember… Twitter is a worldwide platform. Cara has 75% of her followers outside of the United States.

Be subtle… Lead them in; ask questions even if you know the answer… Bring them into your world… And eventually buying your books.

Follow your followers

Twitter is live… Use a smart phone for posting. Do it as the day goes on… Multiple postings.

Learn to use hash tags… (I haven’t done this yet)

You need a phone (or other device) that has a touch screen.

Tweets should be spontaneous.

Establish a following First

80% my stuff… (I found this interesting don’t you?)

20% direct push… Buy my book, it’s great.

Presentation by T. J. McKay… Founder and publisher of  InD’tale magazine

You are what is going to make it happen

The most important thing to make your books happen is you.

The writer must make a decision as to whether it is a hobby or a business

Important factors for attaining success

First impressions     Your voice     Hook… Get the angle fast     Be consistent

Editing         Quality is important

Line editing… Checks punctuation

Content editing… Assuring all factors fit…… He/she… Pistol/revolver

Beta reader… A second reader

Do not choose a fan of your work… A stranger is better… Must be honest

Suggestion:  Furnish three hardcopies of your work… With post-its

Have the reviewer insert Post-it’s where they pause in their reading

(When reviewing all three documents Post-it’s may indicate dull points)

Get reviewed

1)       Personal reviews… Need as many as possible         (500)

2)       Professional reviews… They may have to be purchased

Readers are becoming more sophisticated and don’t want to waste their time. If they can see five-star ratings number of people and professional reviews, there is a better chance that they will buy work.

The book cover

Publishers state that books are judged by their cover.

The cover color is extremely important.

The font must be appropriate for the story

The graphic should relate to the story

A graphic artist who knows what they’re doing should design cover

(This can be accomplished between 50 and 75 dollars)

To be successful you will need these things

A good story

Well edited… line and content

Presence on social media…This is a must…Have current picture of yourself

Smart phone… Spontaneous tweeting

Website… Have a current picture of yourself on the website

This acts as a landing site… and draws the reader closer to you

Allows you to show your work

Provides a path to enable visitors buy your work

Your work must be advertised… It takes 7 to 10 times for anyone will be recognized

Familiarity and Consistency       Be competitive… They must see you

Presenter Jim Barton      award-winning poet

Writing is work        Create and share the magic

Poetry can put magic in your writing

You can’t write you can at least read it… Detailed handout is available

Presenter that Dell Garrett

Plot… It’s what happens on the way through the story

There must be conflict

Internal                 External

Be flexible with the story… The plot should write itself

Know your characters

Start the ball rolling with a hook… Then keep it going

Keep the protagonist confused… You need a reluctant hero

Maintain a touch of realism

Keep it fast-paced

Near the end, there should be a catalyst for change

The hero is responding to the strongest character in your story … the villain

Presenter Linda Apple

Writing for the soul… Do it for the inspiration it provides

Write to yourself

Reach deep into yourself to tell your story

Infuse your story with life

Use your story to influence others in a positive fashion

Write for the reader… Give them something they can take home

Purpose… Write to connect with the reader… What good will the reader receive?

Objective… How do we do this?… What’s in it for me?

Write about a personal experience… Make an observation… Epiphany

Inspirational work is one of the largest selling genres in the general market

Try to turn on a light for the dark mind

Don’t focus on the obstacles… Skis/Trees

Look for a way between the trees

Put legs on your story… Get it to the reader

Don’t say: You should…    Instead, say: I should’ve known that…

Alternatively, possibly: We should have realized…

This type of writing can influence not only the reader, but also the writer.

Info on Tweeter Tweet

We like to say that Twitter was born mobile. After all, the 140 character limit of Tweets was based on text messaging or SMS constraints. That means our platform was actually designed to allow anyone, anywhere to read, write and share Tweets.

Today, mobile is often the primary way people around the globe experience Twitter. Sixty percent of our 200 million active users log in via a mobile device at least once every month. So how is a user that accesses Twitter primarily on mobile different from the average Twitter user?

Working with Compete, we found that these primary mobile Twitter users in the U.S. are more engaged in several key ways. Namely, they are on the platform more often, they interact more with Tweets and they follow more brands. Here are the top five findings that advertisers need to know to better connect with these mobile consumers on Twitter:

1. Primary mobile users may be on the go but they’re on Twitter more than the average user.

Not surprisingly, users who primarily access Twitter via mobile are 47% less likely to use Twitter on the desktop than average Twitter users. They are also on Twitter more often. They are 79% more likely to be on Twitter several times a day than the average Twitter user.

And these mobile users don’t just use phones to access Twitter. Nineteen percent of primary mobile users say that the top way they access Twitter is on a tablet.

Advertiser tip: Many Twitter users rarely access Twitter on desktop so don’t forget about mobile targeting when developing Twitter Ads campaigns. Target messages by device to optimize reach and drive on the go engagement. Think about content that’s easy to interact with and consider the experience beyond the Tweet too – for example, link to sites that are optimized for mobile.

2. Primary mobile Twitter users tend to be younger.

Compete found that 18 to 34 year olds are 21% more likely to be logging into Twitter primarily via a mobile device. Not a big surprise since younger consumers tend to be stronger adopters of mobile in general. We found no statistically significant difference in the gender breakdown of primary mobile users of Twitter. It’s a pretty even split.

Advertiser tip: When targeting on mobile, consider the age of the core audience that you are trying to reach. You may want to prioritize campaigns that more closely align to the life stage of the 18-34 demographic as well as their interests. But, remember, on Twitter who you follow is also a strong indicator of what you care about. When targeting people who follow your brand on mobile, speak to that interest, not just a person’s age.

3. Primary mobile users engage with Twitter throughout the day.

As mobile users go about their daily routines, Twitter is a major part of nearly every aspect of their lives. Primary mobile users are twice as likely to use Twitter when they wake up and twice as likely to use Twitter when going to sleep. I like to think this means they dream about Twitter too.

Primary mobile Twitter users are also 181% more likely to use Twitter during their commutes. Once they get to work or school, they are 119% more likely keep using Twitter. And this Twitter use extends into their social time.

The study found that primarily mobile Twitter users are 127% more likely to use Twitter when they are out with friends. They are over three times more likely to use Twitter while shopping. Primary mobile users are also 202% more likely to use Twitter before and after attending a movie than the average Twitter user.

Fifty-seven percent of mobile Twitter users communicate with people near them via Twitter. What exactly does that mean? Think about times when you send a friend a Tweet who you are meeting at a store to let them know you’ve already arrived. Or you tweet a photo with friends and include their Twitter handles when you’re all out at a restaurant.

Primary mobile users also access Twitter inside the home. Sixty-four percent use Twitter in front of the TV at home. Primarily mobile users are 28% more likely than the average Twitter user to use the platform while they are watching television.

Advertiser tip: When creating Twitter campaigns, think about a day in the life of your target consumers. Consider where they are, what they are doing and who they might be with at key moments during the day and evening. Think about timing Tweets to reach people wherever they are – 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

For some campaigns, this might mean during rush hour when they want to be distracted. Or during the weekend while they are out and about with friends. Don’t miss the chance to engage primary mobile users at home too. Integrate Twitter with your TV strategy to maximize the dual screen experience.

4. Mobile Twitter users engage more with content.

Primarily mobile users aren’t just checking Twitter more often than average Twitter users; they create and engage with Tweets more too. Primary mobile users are 46% more likely to compose original Tweets than the average Twitter user. They are also 44% more likely to click on links, 66% more likely to retweet and 76% more likely to favorite a Tweet.

Advertiser tip: Mobile users tend to be amplifiers. Drive engagement and earned media by creating Tweets that include rich media, links and strong call to actions. Simply including the words “Please retweet” has been shown to increase the likelihood of being retweeted by 23 times, according to Buddy Media.

5. Mobile Twitter are more engaged with brands.

The average Twitter user follows five or more brands. Users who primarily access Twitter on mobile are 60% more likely to follow 11 or more brands. They are also 53% more likely to recall seeing an ad on Twitter than the average Twitter user.

Advertiser Tip: Create Tweets that align with what mobile users need: real-time information that helps them make decisions as they go about their daily lives. They may be shopping near your store and a Tweet about your current promotion might get them in the door. They may be waiting in a line at your bank and looking for information that will make the transaction easier. Think about creating campaigns centered around useful information or special offers that someone can act on immediately.

Bottom line: As consumers continue to shift their time to mobile, a big opportunity arises for brands. Mobile is in our DNA at Twitter, which means our platform can connect your brand to users in real time, wherever they are. Because mobile ads on Twitter are part of the organic content experience, they create a particularly powerful vehicle for brands to create reach, build frequency and drive engagement.

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